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Innovative Program Promotes Brain Health for Seniors

HUD Region II RA Lynne Patton (center) flanked by Rutgers Assistant Chancellor Diane Hill, Director of the Office of University-Community Partnerships and Dr. Mark Gluck, Director of the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience creators of the African-American Brain Health Initiative

HUD Region II Regional Administrator Lynne Patton delivered remarks to New Jersey HUD-subsidized seniors and other Newark residents during a Rutgers University's African-American Brain Health Initiative event designed to teach seniors how to take action to foster brain health.

Dr. Mark Gluck, Director of the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience and Assistant Chancellor Diane Hill, director of the Office of University-Community Partnerships created the AABHI to promote brain health among African-American seniors in greater Newark, New Jersey. Combining research, education, and community engagement, the program seeks to understand why African Americans are at greater risk for Alzheimer's disease, memory loss, and other age-related brain health problems, and what can be done to help improve people's memory and brain health.

RA Patton highlighted HUD Secretary Carson's work as a neurosurgeon and his interest in keeping HUD residents healthy by addressing lead contamination and mold, as well as safety in the home.

The event included multiple speakers that addressed diet, health, and exercise, taking a few minutes to get everyone off their feet and Zumba! There wasn't a "seat" in the house that wasn't swaying to the beat of improved health, cognitive abilities and better circulation.

The morning started with a healthy breakfast and ended with a great lunch, sure to entice seniors to practice recipes from the cookbooks they received and to return for this bi-annual event.

HUD Region II RA Lynne Patton (center) flanked by Rutgers Assistant Chancellor Diane Hill, Director of the Office of University-Community Partnerships and Dr. Mark Gluck, Director of the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience creators of the African-American Brain Health Initiative