Home / Press Room / Press Releases / HUD No. 18-148
 
  
 

HUD No. 18-148
HUD Public Affairs
(202) 708-0685
FOR RELEASE
Tuesday
December 18, 2018

HUD JUDGE ENTERS ORDER SETTLING DISCRIMINATION CLAIM AGAINST NEW JERSEY CONDO ASSOCIATION


WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) today announced Tamaron Association, an association representing residents of a 55-and-older condominium development in Waldwick, New Jersey, will pay $9,000 under an Initial Decision and Consent Order resolving allegations that the association refused to sell a condo to a man with disabilities and his wife because the couple planned to have their adult, disabled daughter live with them. Read the Order.

The Fair Housing Act prohibits housing providers from denying or limiting housing to persons with disabilities and from refusing to make reasonable accommodations in policies or practices.

"No family whose members have disabilities should be denied the reasonable accommodations they need to make a home for themselves,” said Anna María Farías, HUD's Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity. “Hopefully, today’s ruling will remind homeowner associations of their obligations under the Fair Housing Act and encourage them to follow the law.”

Under the terms of the Consent Order, entered by a HUD administrative law judge, Tamaron Association will pay a civil penalty of $9,000 to the United States, undergo fair housing training, and make changes to the associations’ bylaws as they relate to reasonable accommodations. The wife, now a widow, is pursuing claims against Tamaron Association in New Jersey State Court. Tamaron Association denies that it discriminated against the family.

“HUD is committed to ensuring that housing providers, including homeowner associations, do not discriminate against individuals with disabilities,” said Paul Compton, HUD’s General Counsel. “This Consent Decree is a reminder to housing providers that making reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities is an essential part of their legal obligation under the Fair Housing Act.”

April 2018 marked the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Fair Housing Act.  This year, HUD, local communities, housing advocates, and fair housing organizations across the country are conducting a variety of activities to enhance awareness of fair housing rights, highlight HUD's fair housing enforcement efforts, and end housing discrimination in the nation. For a list of activities, visit HUD.gov/FairHousingis50.

The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability and familial status. People who believe they have experienced discrimination may file a complaint by contacting HUD's Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity at (800) 669-9777 (voice) or (800) 927-9275 (TTY). Housing discrimination complaints may also be filed by going to www.hud.gov/fairhousing.

###

HUD's mission is to create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality affordable homes for all.
More information about HUD and its programs is available on the Internet
at www.hud.gov and https://espanol.hud.gov.

You can also connect with HUD on social media and follow Secretary Carson on Twitter and Facebook or sign up for news alerts on HUD's Email List.